Texas, South Carolina Have Most Car Deaths

< 1 min read
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Mail
< 1 min read
Kars For Kids

Kars For Kids

Non profit organization

Kars For Kids

Kars For Kids

Non profit organization

Share

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Mail
Child places pleading hand on back window of car

Texas, South Carolina Have Most Car Deaths

< 1 min read
< 1 min read
Kars For Kids

Kars For Kids

Non profit organization

Kars For Kids

Kars For Kids

Non profit organization

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Mail
Child places pleading hand on back window of car

Texas and South Carolina lay infamous claim to the most hot car deaths this year, with three such deaths, each. In a recent newsletter reporting on the latest hot car deaths, meteorologist Jan Null wrote, “. . .  the total number of Pediatric Vehicular Heatstroke (PVH) deaths for 2018 [is] a staggering 28, with a couple other pending cases and too much summer left! This is the highest number of deaths through July 22nd of any year, going back to 1998. By July 22 last year there were a total of 27 deaths and the year ended with 43.”

Null keeps track of hot car death statistics. When you go to his website, noheatstroke.org, you’re confronted with the number of children who have died from pediatric vehicular heatstroke since 1998, when records were first kept. Under that constantly growing number (it was 769 as of this writing), Null writes, “All of these deaths could have been prevented.”

If only parents would believe these tragedies happen to the best of parents, and take precautions.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Continue reading

two teenage females driver passenger key

Teen Driving Awareness Month: Keeping Teens Safe behind the Wheel

It is fitting that we begin the year by drawing attention to the fact that the leading cause of death for US teens is motor vehicle crashes. According to the CDC, in 2020 along, 8 teenagers aged 13-19 died in car accidents each day. That means that 2,800 teens lost their lives on the road in a single year. Raising awareness means first and foremost, talking with your teenagers about the dangers of driving, and what steps they can take to stay safe.