Are Red Cars More Accident Prone?

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Kars For Kids

Kars For Kids

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Kars For Kids

Kars For Kids

Non profit organization

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Happy man driving red convertible

Are Red Cars More Accident Prone?

< 1 min read
< 1 min read
Kars For Kids

Kars For Kids

Non profit organization

Kars For Kids

Kars For Kids

Non profit organization

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Mail
Happy man driving red convertible

There’s a pervasive double myth out there about red cars:

  • People who buy red cars are aggressive drivers who are more likely to be involved in car accidents
  • Car insurance is higher for red car owners.

But as it turns out, it’s all hogwash. A 2010 study by Stephen O. Owusu-Ansah, found that no one color car is safer or conversely, more dangerous than white, previously thought to be the safest color for a car. Prior to this, researchers thought that white cars were more visible, and therefore, a white car was less likely to be rear-ended.

All that stuff about aggressive drivers and red cars turns out to be a lot of hooey. White, blue, red, green, or silver it’s all the same when it comes to cars and safety.

And you don’t pay more insurance for that dashing red car, either, so knock yourself out, and get whatever color car you like. It doesn’t say anything about the way you drive and it doesn’t have a thing to do with the accident rate.

Sometimes a color is just a color.

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